Tony Duquette, Splashing Water sconce for the opening gala of the Robertson Boulevard studios, 1956
Tony Duquette, Splashing Water sconce for the opening gala of the Robertson Boulevard studios, 1956
Tony Duquette, California Sunburst sconce, 1964
Tony Duquette, California Sunburst sconce, 1964
Paul Laszlo, sconces, 1940s
Paul Laszlo, sconces, 1940s
William Haines, Ice Crystals sconce for the May house, 1953
William Haines, Ice Crystals sconce for the May house, 1953

Californian decorative design of the 1940s - 1960s is one big theatre. Spectacular theatrical style of the three prominent decorators from this period is seen on these sconces too.

And why theatre? The design of this significant movement in the modern American design is based on visual effects, emotions, as well as theatrical feelings and historicism. One of the decorators here presented is also the theater, film and set designer and scenographer. Tony Duquette (1914 - 1999) is the true legend. His fantastical decorative style is represented in these two beautiful decorative sconces too. French classical style of the 17th century goes modern.

One of the collaborators of Duquette was William Haines (1900 - 1973), movie star in the 1920s became famous interior designer in 1930s. His work from the following postwar years is synonymous for the luxury style of the Californian movie society. This Ice Crystals sconce is made out of faceted pieces of acrylic material creating whole abstract lightning sculpture.

More classicist attitude to design is seen in the 1940s sconce design by architect and designer Paul Laszlo (1900 - 1993), who became also very popular decorator for the richest in the postwar Los Angeles.

On these designs you can see some of the main features of the Californian decorative design scene of this period.

Tony Duquette, Splashing Water sconce for the opening gala of the Robertson Boulevard studios, 1956
Tony Duquette, Splashing Water sconce for the opening gala of the Robertson Boulevard studios, 1956
Tony Duquette, California Sunburst sconce, 1964
Tony Duquette, California Sunburst sconce, 1964
Paul Laszlo, sconces, 1940s
Paul Laszlo, sconces, 1940s
William Haines, Ice Crystals sconce for the May house, 1953
William Haines, Ice Crystals sconce for the May house, 1953

Californian decorative design of the 1940s - 1960s is one big theatre. Spectacular theatrical style of the three prominent decorators from this period is seen on these sconces too.

And why theatre? The design of this significant movement in the modern American design is based on visual effects, emotions, as well as theatrical feelings and historicism. One of the decorators here presented is also the theater, film and set designer and scenographer. Tony Duquette (1914 - 1999) is the true legend. His fantastical decorative style is represented in these two beautiful decorative sconces too. French classical style of the 17th century goes modern.

One of the collaborators of Duquette was William Haines (1900 - 1973), movie star in the 1920s became famous interior designer in 1930s. His work from the following postwar years is synonymous for the luxury style of the Californian movie society. This Ice Crystals sconce is made out of faceted pieces of acrylic material creating whole abstract lightning sculpture.

More classicist attitude to design is seen in the 1940s sconce design by architect and designer Paul Laszlo (1900 - 1993), who became also very popular decorator for the richest in the postwar Los Angeles.

On these designs you can see some of the main features of the Californian decorative design scene of this period.





Innovo is an interesting design studio based in Hangzhou, China.

Some times ago we have discovered some of their innovative products, which stands between tradition and progressive design. Founded by very international team of Zhang Lei, Jovana Bogdanovic, Christoph John and Vladimer Kobakhidze, the studio works in the wide range of design projects from transport to stationary.

Recently we were amazed by some very clever and pure products which studio has designed as a Future Tradition collection inspired by traditional Chinese umbrella designs and presented at this year Salone Satellite exhibition in Milan.

Chao is an original desktop accessory made out of wood, rice paper and glue. While it is closed, it looks like a paper notebook, but when we open it, the nice paper structure with a lot of pockets for small things is ready to use. The another product from the collection is the Yi lamp, which is made out of the same materials. Its body from wood is shaped to rest the open book there. The another products from the collection are paper chair, umbrellas and hanging lights.





We are continuing with our short Ljubljana architecture survey. This time about Ljubljana architecture publishing.

Now we have here two interesting magazines based in Slovenian capital. Piranesi and Hiše (in English House) reflects both Slovenian architectural history, as well as its very successful present.

Hiše magazin published six times per a year is specialized in family houses architecture around the world. Published by Zavod Big agency, the magazine in the style of more famous, dutch Mark, Hiše showcases very interesting selection of world family houses including work by young Czech practice and our friends A1 Architects from Prague (their teahouse is on the cover of issue 66). Once a year, Hiše published also the special edition of the magazine with annual Nagrade Hiše awards.

Piranesi magazine is a child of the successful architect Vojteh Ravnikar from the Slovenian practice Ravnikar Potokar, which he founded with his friend Robert Potokar. Since 1992 they have published Piranesi magazine which is focused on architecture of the central and eastern Europe. Very nice concept of the magazine is based on the showcase of the recent projects from the various countries of the region, which are completed by one historical project in every issue. So you can read here about very interesting, but hidden modernist masterpieces as well. For example about spectacular 1960s Gino Valle Zanussi headquarters in Italy. Piranesi is published once or twice per a year.

Both magazines represent very high quality of the Slovenian architectural scene and creates very nice theoretic and popular background of this creative discipline.






We are continuing with our short Ljubljana architecture survey. This time about Ljubljana architecture publishing.

Now we have here two interesting magazines based in Slovenian capital. Piranesi and Hiše (in English House) reflects both Slovenian architectural history, as well as its very successful present.

Hiše magazin published six times per a year is specialized in family houses architecture around the world. Published by Zavod Big agency, the magazine in the style of more famous, dutch Mark, Hiše showcases very interesting selection of world family houses including work by young Czech practice and our friends A1 Architects from Prague (their teahouse is on the cover of issue 66). Once a year, Hiše published also the special edition of the magazine with annual Nagrade Hiše awards.

Piranesi magazine is a child of the successful architect Vojteh Ravnikar from the Slovenian practice Ravnikar Potokar, which he founded with his friend Robert Potokar. Since 1992 they have published Piranesi magazine which is focused on architecture of the central and eastern Europe. Very nice concept of the magazine is based on the showcase of the recent projects from the various countries of the region, which are completed by one historical project in every issue. So you can read here about very interesting, but hidden modernist masterpieces as well. For example about spectacular 1960s Gino Valle Zanussi headquarters in Italy. Piranesi is published once or twice per a year.

Both magazines represent very high quality of the Slovenian architectural scene and creates very nice theoretic and popular background of this creative discipline.



Lancia is a legend. Its ultimate rally machines of the second half of the last century represent incredible and orthodox sport design. One of the most beautiful is this ECV Group S prototype.

ECV (Experimental Composite Vehicle) was first introduced in 1986 as a prototype developed by the Italian manufacturer Lancia to replace the Lancia Delta S4 in World Rally Championship competition for the 1988 season. Unfortunately, the ECV never raced, because Group S cars were banned from the competition by FIA due to safety concerns.

Design of the Lancia is very compact and presents the natural continuation of the radical shapes of older Lancia Delta. ECV includes special Triflux engine with 600 horsepower, bodywork made out of Kevlar and carbon fibers, as well as in its time new graphic design of the Martini company, traditional partner of the Lancia rally team.


In the group of recent ECAL graduates we have found a really nice game.

Designed by Romain Lagrange, the Gates is a stylish outdoor game. Complete with the wooden gates, round box for balls and in the same minimalist manner pair of playing sticks create together nice sport and entertainment equipment as well as sculptural wooden piece.

Lagrange has designed it as a final project of his Mas-Luxe course at Ecal in Lausanne.









Last week we have visited Slovenian capital, Ljubljana. Its architecture past and present is impressive. The city not bigger than the Czech Brno has a very strong architectural heritage.

Except many buildings in the centre of the city, we have discovered the unique functionalist villa hidden in the jungle of greenery. Villa Oblak, which is today national monument of Slovenia, was built in 1931 - 1935 by architect, France Tomažič (1899 - 1968). Tomažič was a student of Josef Plečnik, key figure in Slovenian architectural history, and also member of "Petkovci" group. This group included many representatives of modern architecture in Ljubljana and in the 1930s was one of the strongest movement of the Slovenian functionalism.

Villa Oblak is his most famous work and represents very interesting example of the Slovenian functionalism. Today, the villa is hidden in the greenery that we can not see its original form almost. Most original part of the house is the big arch creating original exterior space with two-armed staircase.

More about Slovenian architecture soon...









Last week we have visited Slovenian capital, Ljubljana. Its architecture past and present is impressive. The city not bigger than the Czech Brno has a very strong architectural heritage.

Except many buildings in the centre of the city, we have discovered the unique functionalist villa hidden in the jungle of greenery. Villa Oblak, which is today national monument of Slovenia, was built in 1931 - 1935 by architect, France Tomažič (1899 - 1968). Tomažič was a student of Josef Plečnik, key figure in Slovenian architectural history, and also member of "Petkovci" group. This group included many representatives of modern architecture in Ljubljana and in the 1930s was one of the strongest movement of the Slovenian functionalism.

Villa Oblak is his most famous work and represents very interesting example of the Slovenian functionalism. Today, the villa is hidden in the greenery that we can not see its original form almost. Most original part of the house is the big arch creating original exterior space with two-armed staircase.

More about Slovenian architecture soon...




When in Italy, we always enjoy high quality of food products there. This time we were amazed by nice packagings of the Italian butters.

Three butters, three companies and three very nice graphic and packaging solutions. Soligo, Prealpi and Asolo are among others one of the most favorite Italian producers of butter. Products of these traditional companies (Soligo was founded in 1883 and Prealpi in 1922) you can buy in every grocery shop or supermarket. Design of their packaging is based on the long time tradition of the companies and is very natural part of the whole product.

Some more from our recent trip to Venice and Ljubljana this week!