Jean Royere, Lounge chair from l'Exposition Internationale of 1937
France, 1937
Jean Royere, Lounge chair from l'Exposition Internationale of 1937 France, 1937
René Herbst, Lounge chair, Assise et Dossier en Sandow, Réédition Formes Nouvelles, 1930
René Herbst, Lounge chair, Assise et Dossier en Sandow, Réédition Formes Nouvelles, 1930
Francois Turpin, Chaise Lounge, 1933
Francois Turpin, Chaise Lounge, 1933
Jean Prouvé, Cité armchair, 1933
Jean Prouvé, Cité armchair, 1933

We have selected some of the finest chaise lounges designs of the 1930s French Modernism with the touch of aerodynamic and motive of speed.





We start with the presentation of individual collections during our OKOLO OFFLINE TWO exhibition at Kunstgewerbemuseum Dresden. We start with the first room where all the vitrines and pedestals create spatial installation symbolizing collecting itself.

A vitrine serves collectors and museums as a means to exhibit and preserve objects and to bring their collections together in a protected space. Assembled from various pieces of exhibition furniture at the Kunstgewerbemuseum, this installation becomes a symbol of collecting and a symbol of the exhibition itself.

OKOLO OFFLINE TWO, COLLECTING
Kunstgewerbemuseum
Schloss Pillnitz, Bergpalais
3 September - 2 November

Photos: OKOLO, Courtesy of Kunstgewerbemuseum







Beautiful creative symbiosis of Swedish Hilda Hellström and American Bec Brittain in their first collaborative project.

BBxHH is the spectacular chandelier designed by American lighting designer Bec Brittain in collaboration with Swedish conceptual designer Hilda Hellström. The piece connects the precious nickel abstract structure of Bec Brittain with the Hilda's signature use of acrylic-based plaster, Jesmonit, in the decorative pattern components added to the structure.

The result is the synthesis of two different creative characters, materials and styles in one unique piece.


8. Packaging Collection
8. Packaging Collection
9. Typeface Collection
9. Typeface Collection
7. Experience Collection
7. Experience Collection
6. Sport Collection
6. Sport Collection
5. Ordinary Collection
5. Ordinary Collection
Last room with Unique, Ordinary, Sport, Packaging, Experience and Typeface Collections.
Last room with Unique, Ordinary, Sport, Packaging, Experience and Typeface Collections.
1. First room with the installation of exhibition vitrines and pedestals as a symbol of collecting
1. First room with the installation of exhibition vitrines and pedestals as a symbol of collecting
2. Video Collection
2. Video Collection






4. Unique Collection
4. Unique Collection
3. Collection of opinions on collecting from the various contributors exhibited on the custom-designed paper cards
3. Collection of opinions on collecting from the various contributors exhibited on the custom-designed paper cards

Visual style of the exhibition
Visual style of the exhibition
Headline of the exhibition applied on the empty vitrine
Headline of the exhibition applied on the empty vitrine

One of the structures made out of pedestals symbolizing phenomenon of collecting
One of the structures made out of pedestals symbolizing phenomenon of collecting

Last week we have opened, together with Depot Basel, our OKOLO OFFLINE TWO, COLLECTING exhibition at Kunstgewerbemuseum at Schloss Pillnitz in Dresden.

Our biggest exhibition to date explores the phenomenon of collecting from many different perspectives including 9 various collections installed inside the historical chambers of the museum's Bergpalais. Now we are presenting general installation and concept. From now until the end of the exhibition we will present also each collection and its details separately every week and transform the physical installation into the online content.

Until barely ten years ago, objects and the stories associated with them were generally only made publicly accessible within exhibiting institutions. However, due to the increasing diversity and availability of digital media, the visibility and accessibility of collections has changed, and they now receive more attention than ever before. In parallel to this, a completely different level of collecting, the blog, has emerged. Bloggers regard themselves as curators, and as – occasionally critical – collectors of content, which they publish online and make accessible to a wider public. Thus the concepts of collecting and making visible have acquired entirely new meaning.

The Czech collective Okolo is active in this field. They have been posting thematic collections of objects and images on their blog since 2009. Like most digital collectors, they do not collect to possess objects, but – in a very similar way to museums – to preserve contemporary and historical objects and to make them accessible in an entirely new context. Okolo specialises in design and collects with a deliberately tightly focused approach. On their many travels and during research they are continually discovering what was previously unseen or unnoticed; by photographing their discoveries, giving them graphic redefinition, and then publishing them, they create new awareness of, and stimulate interest in, things which had previously attracted little or no attention.

Moving on from the “OKOLO OFFLINE” exhibition at Depot Basel, which aimed to make it possible to experience the digital collection in physical space, the exhibition in Dresden focuses on the topic of collecting itself. New object groups, assembled from things in Okolo’s personal archive, pieces from the Kunstgewerbemuseum’s collections and loans from friends, are displayed. Each collection is presented in its own vitrine, and each tells a story about collecting – be it concrete objects, accumulated experiences, the vitrine itself as a container for collections, or the widely diverse opinions of collectors.

For the duration of the exhibition, these collections will be also be the subject of specially focused blog entries on www.okoloweb.cz, thereby interlinking the analogue
 world of the exhibition with
 the digital.

Curatorial text of the exhibition by Matylda Krzykowski

OKOLO OFFLINE TWO, COLLECTING
Kunstgewerbemuseum
Schloss Pillnitz, Bergpalais
3 September - 2 November

Photos: OKOLO, Courtesy of Kunstgewerbemuseum


8. Packaging Collection
8. Packaging Collection
9. Typeface Collection
9. Typeface Collection
7. Experience Collection
7. Experience Collection
6. Sport Collection
6. Sport Collection
5. Ordinary Collection
5. Ordinary Collection
Last room with Unique, Ordinary, Sport, Packaging, Experience and Typeface Collections.
Last room with Unique, Ordinary, Sport, Packaging, Experience and Typeface Collections.
1. First room with the installation of exhibition vitrines and pedestals as a symbol of collecting
1. First room with the installation of exhibition vitrines and pedestals as a symbol of collecting
2. Video Collection
2. Video Collection






4. Unique Collection
4. Unique Collection
3. Collection of opinions on collecting from the various contributors exhibited on the custom-designed paper cards
3. Collection of opinions on collecting from the various contributors exhibited on the custom-designed paper cards

Visual style of the exhibition
Visual style of the exhibition
Headline of the exhibition applied on the empty vitrine
Headline of the exhibition applied on the empty vitrine

One of the structures made out of pedestals symbolizing phenomenon of collecting
One of the structures made out of pedestals symbolizing phenomenon of collecting

Last week we have opened, together with Depot Basel, our OKOLO OFFLINE TWO, COLLECTING exhibition at Kunstgewerbemuseum at Schloss Pillnitz in Dresden.

Our biggest exhibition to date explores the phenomenon of collecting from many different perspectives including 9 various collections installed inside the historical chambers of the museum's Bergpalais. Now we are presenting general installation and concept. From now until the end of the exhibition we will present also each collection and its details separately every week and transform the physical installation into the online content.

Until barely ten years ago, objects and the stories associated with them were generally only made publicly accessible within exhibiting institutions. However, due to the increasing diversity and availability of digital media, the visibility and accessibility of collections has changed, and they now receive more attention than ever before. In parallel to this, a completely different level of collecting, the blog, has emerged. Bloggers regard themselves as curators, and as – occasionally critical – collectors of content, which they publish online and make accessible to a wider public. Thus the concepts of collecting and making visible have acquired entirely new meaning.

The Czech collective Okolo is active in this field. They have been posting thematic collections of objects and images on their blog since 2009. Like most digital collectors, they do not collect to possess objects, but – in a very similar way to museums – to preserve contemporary and historical objects and to make them accessible in an entirely new context. Okolo specialises in design and collects with a deliberately tightly focused approach. On their many travels and during research they are continually discovering what was previously unseen or unnoticed; by photographing their discoveries, giving them graphic redefinition, and then publishing them, they create new awareness of, and stimulate interest in, things which had previously attracted little or no attention.

Moving on from the “OKOLO OFFLINE” exhibition at Depot Basel, which aimed to make it possible to experience the digital collection in physical space, the exhibition in Dresden focuses on the topic of collecting itself. New object groups, assembled from things in Okolo’s personal archive, pieces from the Kunstgewerbemuseum’s collections and loans from friends, are displayed. Each collection is presented in its own vitrine, and each tells a story about collecting – be it concrete objects, accumulated experiences, the vitrine itself as a container for collections, or the widely diverse opinions of collectors.

For the duration of the exhibition, these collections will be also be the subject of specially focused blog entries on www.okoloweb.cz, thereby interlinking the analogue
 world of the exhibition with
 the digital.

Curatorial text of the exhibition by Matylda Krzykowski

OKOLO OFFLINE TWO, COLLECTING
Kunstgewerbemuseum
Schloss Pillnitz, Bergpalais
3 September - 2 November

Photos: OKOLO, Courtesy of Kunstgewerbemuseum



This amazing glass four-panel screen was designed and made at Venini in 1967.

Photo Courtesy of Phillips de Pury






Fot the latest 45th issue of Damn magazine we prepared 7-pages editorial on hidden gems of Italian Modernist architecture.

Featuring mid-century residences a rare work by Carlo Scarpa, Luigi Moretti, Mario Galvagni, Vittoriano Vigano, Ico Parisi or Luzi & Jaretti, the article explores lesser known architectural masterpieces we have visited in the last 5 years all around Italy.

Thanks Damn for the publishing.






Fot the latest 45th issue of Damn magazine we prepared 7-pages editorial on hidden gems of Italian Modernist architecture.

Featuring mid-century residences a rare work by Carlo Scarpa, Luigi Moretti, Mario Galvagni, Vittoriano Vigano, Ico Parisi or Luzi & Jaretti, the article explores lesser known architectural masterpieces we have visited in the last 5 years all around Italy.

Thanks Damn for the publishing.


Tasco is the unique one-off car prototype designed by Gordon Buehrig in 1948. The car includes T-top roof, airplane inspired controls and fiberglass steerable front fenders. It is housed at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

Photo by Peter Harholdt








Our friend and collaborator, designer Martin Žampach, paid visit to one of the most significant buildings of brazilian Modernism and took these images of the concrete jungle around.

Built by Oscar Niemeyer from 1952 to 1966, Edifício Copan, named after ancident Mayan city, is a residential megastructure. One of the biggest buildings in Brazil, Copan in downtown São Paulo has 38 stories and 140 meters.

The sensual curve of the building illustrates typical Niemeyer's organic approach to architecture in those years.